November 30 – December 2, 2010     * * *     Washington D.C.

 
CONCURRENT TECHNICAL SESSIONS

Technical Sessions

This year’s Symposium & Workshop will offer a comprehensive technical program featuring 14 technical sessions and three short courses. Following the Plenary Session on Tuesday, technical sessions will highlight research and innovative technologies that assist the Department of Defense (DoD) in addressing increasingly complex environmental challenges.
 
Speaker abstracts will be available on this web page in early November for attendees to preview beforehand. After the Symposium, speaker presentations will be uploaded to this site.
 
The following list indicates when each technical session will occur and which short courses might also be taking place at those same times. For more information about each session, click the session number to view a brief description. This page will be updated as more information becomes available. Detailed agendas will be posted as speakers are confirmed for each session in the early fall time period.
 
TUESDAY AFTERNOON:
Session 1A – Opening the Arctic: Science Challenges to Understanding the Impacts of Climate Change
Session 1B – Lead-Free Electronics
Session 1C – Remediation and Management of Persistent Chlorinated Solvent Contamination
Session 1D – Military Installations as Test Beds for Innovative Energy Efficiency Technologies
 
WEDNESDAY MORNING:
Session 2A – Sea Level Rise: Assessing Vulnerabilities and Impacts 
Session 2B – Minimizing Hexavalent Chromium Use in DoD Operations
Session 2C – Monitoring and Mitigation of Vapor Intrusion from Contaminated Groundwater Sites
Session 2D – Classification Methods for Military Munitions Response
 
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON:
Session 3A – National Environmental Monitoring and Indicator Systems: Implications for DoD
Session 3B – Aviation and the Environment: Deicing and Noise
Session 3C – Evaluating the Environmental Impacts of Energetic Materials
Short Course 1: Advances in Classification Methods for Military Munitions Response. More information 
Short Course 2: Principles and Practices of In Situ Chemical Oxidation. More information
 
THURSDAY MORNING:
Session 4A – Military Munitions in the Underwater Environment
Session 4B – Maintaining Sustainability of Forward Operating Bases
Session 4C – Passive Sampling Approaches for Contaminated Sediment Management
Short Course 3: Measurement and Use of Mass Discharge and Mass Flux at Contaminated Sites. More information

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TECHNICAL SESSION DESCRIPTIONS – TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Session 1A – Opening the Arctic: Science Challenges to Understanding the Impacts of Climate Change
Description:  The Arctic poses unique challenges relative to climate change that will have profound implications for how the Navy operates and sustains its current and emerging missions in the Arctic. From reductions in seasonal sea ice that open up new shipping routes, to amplified coastal erosion, to melting permafrost, climate change is likely to alter the environment in ways that introduce new physical processes and unexpected ecological changes. This session will explore the variety of science challenges that now confront our understanding of the Arctic and the Navy's ability to conduct its activities on the sea and on land in an environmentally sound manner in this unique region.

Session 1B – Lead-Free Electronics
Description:  Throughout the electronics industry, lead has been a primary ingredient of finishes and solder in components and electrical attachment leads for more than 50 years. The health risks associated with lead are widely known. Though the majority of lead is recycled, approximately 2 percent can end up in landfills primarily from consumable commercial electronic equipment. Recent directives and legislation issued both internationally as well as by several states in the United States have mandated the elimination of lead and other hazardous materials in some sectors of the electronics industry. Lead-free solders are now widely used in the commercial sector, but the growth of whiskers from these materials over extended periods of time, as well as the reduced resistance to shock and vibration, can cause early system failure. Electrical systems used in DoD and the aerospace sector are required to work properly for much longer periods of time than most consumer electronics so the higher failure rate in harsh environments is a significant concern. This session will highlight efforts to address the issues associated with lead-free electronics in DoD weapons and general aerospace systems.


Session 1C – Remediation and Management of Persistent Chlorinated Solvent Contamination
Description:  Chlorinated solvents are the most prevalent groundwater contaminants found on DoD sites and often challenge traditional treatment approaches. This technical session will provide an overview of the current efforts in SERDP and ESTCP to better understand and manage persistent contamination, including contamination residing in difficult-to-treat environments such as fractured rock and low permeability areas. Contamination by dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and methods to better remediate and monitor persistent chlorinated solvent contamination will also be discussed, along with scientific issues associated with achieving site closure and implementing long-term management of such sites.

Session 1D – Military Installations as Test Beds for Innovative Energy Efficiency Technologies
Description:  DoD operates more than 500 installations with approximately 300,000 buildings and 160,000 non-tactical support vehicles. Powering these operations costs DoD nearly $4 billion annually and generates significant amounts of greenhouse gases. Recognizing the environmental, economic, and operational benefits to improving energy efficiency, DoD has committed to aggressive goals for improving energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To achieve these goals, DoD must rapidly implement innovative technologies capable of realizing large gains in efficiency. This session will showcase emerging energy efficiency and energy management technologies being tested on DoD installations and identify potential solutions for overcoming obstacles to broad-scale implementation.

TECHNICAL SESSION DESCRIPTIONS – WEDNESDAY MORNING

Session 2A – Sea Level Rise: Assessing Vulnerabilities and Impacts
Description:  Climate change-induced sea level rise along with storm surge present significant risks to the missions of DoD coastal installations and associated military readiness. Potential local effects include changes in the frequency and intensity of coastal storms, precipitation, and ocean currents. Environmental effects are predicted to be far reaching and will vary geographically, and include increased storm damage to coastal infrastructure, more rapid coastal erosion and shoreline change, saltwater intrusion into aquifers and surface waters, rising water tables, and changes in tidal prism. Recent legislation requires DoD to provide guidance to military planners to assess the risks of potential climate change. This session will examine research that is developing the methods, models, and tools for assessing the vulnerabilities and impacts of sea level rise and storm surge, both within and beyond DoD.

Session 2B – Minimizing Hexavalent Chromium Use in DoD Operations

Description:   Chemical compounds containing hexavalent chromium - Cr(VI) - are widely used in coatings and surface finishing operations on DoD weapons systems, principally to impart corrosion resistance. However, Cr(VI) is a known carcinogen, and in 2006, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration reduced the permissible exposure limit by an order of magnitude. In April 2009, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics issued a memo restricting the use of Cr(VI), unless there are no cost-effective alternatives with satisfactory performance. A clause in the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations is being considered that would restrict the use of materials containing Cr(VI) in new weapons systems. This session will highlight recent research and demonstration/validation efforts intended to develop, qualify, and implement alternative materials and processes that do not utilize Cr(VI).
 
Session 2C – Monitoring and Mitigation of Vapor Intrusion from Contaminated Groundwater Sites
Description:
  Vapor intrusion pathways from groundwater to indoor air are difficult to predict and measure due to many complex natural processes. Risks associated with exposure from vapor intrusion-impacted sites drive many corrective action plans and site cleanup, and simple criteria for identifying potentially problematic sites are needed to provide a more confident and cost effective assessment of the groundwater to indoor air pathway. This session will discuss the results of real-world vapor intrusion studies representing a range of soil, groundwater, and building conditions to characterize the chemical and physical mechanisms and site parameters controlling the transport of volatile organic compounds from groundwater to overlying structures.

Session 2D – Classification Methods for Military Munitions Response
Description:  At present, most munitions response projects use sensors that were originally developed for other purposes and adapted to the munitions response mission. Until recently, it has been common practice to dig every target on the detection list, with the result that often as few as 1% of the items excavated are actually hazardous. Innovative munitions response technologies offer a rigorous, effective, and transparent method for classifying and distinguishing between harmless sub-surface scrap and dangerous buried UXO. These technologies are now making a transition to the field through demonstrations on live munitions response sites. Presentations in this session will focus on recent classification demonstration results at the former Camp Butner, North Carolina.


TECHNICAL SESSION DESCRIPTIONS – WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON


Session 3A – National Environmental Monitoring and Indicator Systems: Implications for DoD
Description:  Ecological indicators place environmental status and trend information within a broad spatial context. They can be used to inform decision-makers and the public about the status of the nation's ecosystems and how they may be changing. Several ongoing efforts include the Ecological Indicators for the Nation, National Phenology Network, National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), and Landscape Conservation Cooperatives. Each of these is an attempt to provide (1) context information to inform finer scale efforts, (2) monitoring and indicator approaches that may operate across spatial scales, and (3) information to guide resource management decisions relative to landscape-scale stressors. This session will explore these different initiatives and how they relate to the information needs of DoD installation and range natural resource managers.
 
Session 3B – Aviation and the Environment: Deicing and Noise
Description:  Environmental impacts associated with the operation of military aircraft include deicing of aircraft and runways and the noise generated by aircraft engines. Deicing is critical for operation in adverse weather conditions but has a significant environmental impact when runoff of deicing agents occurs. The high-performance engines used in military aircraft generate a tremendous amount of noise even at sub-sonic speeds. In addition to the negative effects on flightline personnel, this noise can affect the ability to base and operate military aircraft near communities. This session will feature efforts to (1) develop and implement new deicing materials that significantly reduce the impact on ecosystems and (2) model the impact of noise on the environment and develop technologies for reducing noise generation.

Session 3C – Evaluating the Environmental Impacts of Energetic Materials
Description:  Energetic materials are used across DoD in mission-critical munitions, such as projectiles, rockets, missiles, and pyrotechnic devices. DoD must address numerous environmental and occupational safety and health issues associated with energetic materials throughout their life-cycle. Ongoing efforts seek to maintain DoD’s ability to complete its mission by developing environmentally friendly alternatives, remediating currently contaminated sites, and evaluating the impacts of energetic materials on humans and the environment. This session will provide an overview of current efforts that are assessing the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of existing and new energetic compounds to ultimately reduce the environmental and human health risks of these materials throughout their life-cycle.

TECHNICAL SESSION DESCRIPTIONS – THURSDAY MORNING

Session 4A – Military Munitions in the Underwater Environment
Description:
  Many active and former military installations have ranges and training areas with UXO contamination that include water environments such as ponds, lakes, rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean areas. Many attributes of the underwater environment interfere with the detection, characterization, and recovery of UXO. Except at very shallow sites, munitions underwater are difficult to access, conditions interfere with the ability of sensors to detect and characterize them, and remediation is more difficult. This session will highlight efforts that are improving detection and disposal methods for these underwater munitions.

Session 4B – Maintaining Sustainability of Forward Operating Bases
Description:
  Forward operating bases provide a secure forward position to support tactical operations. Often, forward operating bases are used for extended periods, resulting in a number of challenges to meet basic needs on a daily basis. To ensure the sustainability of forward operating bases, it is critical to reduce energy and water consumption, while still meeting mission requirements and protecting human health and the environment. Storage or disposal of hazardous and solid waste can result in soil and groundwater contamination and increase wastewater handling requirements. Inefficient energy production has environmental impacts, as well as unnecessary logistical burdens, all of which present challenges to the health and safety of deployed troops. This session will discuss environmental management strategies that aim to achieve forward operating base sustainability through the use of emerging environmental technologies.     

Session 4C – Passive Sampling Approaches for Contaminated Sediment Management
Description:
  DoD is currently managing hundreds of contaminated sediment sites. Although numerous sampling approaches exist to characterize contamination, they are often costly because of the need to collect a representative suite of samples to define the scope of the problem. Substantial analytical challenges also arise from complex mixtures. Sediment concentrations often inaccurately reflect exposures of receptors and corresponding risks. An alternative approach is the use of passive samplers that can provide a representative assessment of contaminant levels that accumulate over a period of time in proportion to those compounds to which the samplers have been exposed. This session will highlight the various passive sampling techniques and the benefits to using passive samplers to more accurately monitor bioavailability and contaminant mobility.

Latest News
The Call for Poster Abstracts has been released with poster abstract submissions due no later than July 30, 2010.
Symposium Registration will be open by July 21. As information about this event becomes available, it will be posted on this site.

Information about the past Partners Symposiums is available under the following links.
~ December 1-3, 2009
~ December 2-4, 2008
~ December 4-6, 2007

If you have any questions about the Symposium, please e-mail partners@hgl.com or call the contact line at 703-736-4548.

 
 
 
 
 
 
For more information about SERDP, ESTCP, or to comment on this web site, please click here.

Partners In Environmental Technology Technical Symposium & Workshop